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Fox TV Stations Pick Up Classic Game Shows from Fremantle Library

Fox TV Stations Pick Up Classic Game Shows from Fremantle Library

Packaged as Buzzr TV, over 40,000 hours of classic game shows are available from Fremantle.


Classic game show fans may have a slight panic attack this morning. Fox-owned television stations have picked up the digital multi-cast network Buzzr TV from Fremantle Media and Debmar-Mercury. The network launches this summer and will air on the 17 fox owned-and-operated stations with more to come. Think of it like MeTV or Antenna TV.

What does this mean to you? If you’re one of the stations you are looking at blocks of classic game shows from a library with over 40,000 hours. Titles include Family Feud featuring all hosts from Richard Dawson to present, The Price is RightLet’s Make A Deal with Monty Hall, To Tell The Truth, Password, Match Game, Beat the Clock, What’s My Line?, Blockbusters, and Card Sharks.

Fremantle acts as a packager to Buzzr TV, choosing which game shows to air on the digital multicast network. This is then sold as a package to stations, delivered by satellite. This deal with the Fox stations represents about 37% of the homes in the country and Debmar-Mercury is working on deals for the rest of the country at NATPE.

“FremantleMedia has consistently been the leader in the game show space, with long-running and more-popular-than-ever titles such as Family Feud and The Price Is Right,” said Thom Beers, CEO of FremantleMedia North America. “When I joined the company two years ago, it became instantly clear that there was a huge opportunity for us to not only be a producer in the space but also a programmer. We are thrilled to have Fox, one of the nation’s largest owned-and-operated network broadcast groups, as our launch partner on Buzzr TV. Jack Abernethy and Frank Cicha’s enthusiasm for both the channel and our product was clear from the get-go, and we look forward to bringing this beloved genre to viewers across the country.”

Source: THR

  • DC

    So, “AntennaTV” meets “GSN”… a dream for at least most of the people who frequent this site, LOL….. all the old GSN reruns without any new stuff.

  • Jim M.

    To “UncleVanya” (and others) concerned about this broadcast versus
    cable/satellite signal situation relative to the proposed FOX broadcast
    game show channel–

    You wouldn’t likely lose “Match Game” (should the syndicated rights of the show even be transferred from GSN to this in-development FOX-owned broadcast game show channel) so long as your geographical locale has a FOX affiliate that decides to activate its digital sub-channel option, thus you would be able to obtain this new FOX game show channel for free since it is supposed to be a broadcast/over-the-air (OTA) channel. Whether you have cable and/or satellite service would be irrelevant, as all you would need is an antenna connection to your TV in addition to whatever cable/satellite connection(s) you may also have.

    If your Time Warner service (“UncleVanya”) is allowed to add this FOX game show channel, then you wouldn’t even need a TV antenna connection to obtain the channel’s signal. But I advise everyone to set up a TV antenna connection, whether they have cable/satellite services or not, since eventually most will face a situation where their cable/satellite services don’t carry a particular broadcast channel. With antenna connectivity, all that will be necessary is the one-time cost of the antenna and cables to hook up to one’s TV set. Most newer (manufactured post-2010, anyway) TV sets come with built-in tuners, so a digital converter box is unnecessary unless one still has older, tube TV sets without the built-in tuners.

    One may also be able to utilize one’s cable and/or DVD/VCR player-recorder(s) as sort of switchboxes between antenna and cable/satellite reception, or else consult your cable/satellite TV technician (or a good electronics store tech) about which media setup is best for your particular situation.

    I also advise when one purchases a TV antenna to investigate which one will be sufficient to pull in longer-range transmissions obtainable in one’s geographical terrain. Such factors as tall buildings, mountains and/or large trees may be obstructions to more direct TV station transmissions. Besides simpler “rabbit ears” antennas, more sophisticated amplified and longer-range antennas are available one may install either in the interior of one’s home, on the rooftop, or even in an attic or highest-story crawlspace (generally, the position of one’s antenna and the highest point possible the better for pulling in the furthest available signals). But unless one has expertise in antenna installation, (for those attic and rooftop antenna installations) please consult an expert, because it is possible with incorrect installation one could obtain water leaks in one’s roof as well the issue of proper electrical grounding to guard against lightning strikes of one’s home (especially for mobile homes/trailers). In apartment and condominium situations, liability could be incurred if one’s antenna installation creates a water leak that damages the unit of another resident. Most interior TV antenna installations should be safe, however.

    The following Internet websites are helpful in researching the distances of
    TV station transmitters from the address of TV antenna(s) installation. The color-coordinated chart and map results help one determine which type of antenna is sufficient for the relevant channel(s) reception–

    TVFool.com, AntennaWeb.org

    I hope this information is basically helpful. Beyond this, please consult
    an audio-video expert. The Best Buy and Radio Shack retail chains are
    sometimes good resources for a/v and antenna information (depends upon the individual chain-owned or franchise store as to quality level of
    customer service), as well independent and local electronics stores
    known to have reliable customer service.

  • Jim M.

    To “UncleVanya” (and others) concerned about this broadcast versus
    cable/satellite signal situation relative to the proposed FOX “Buzzr TV”
    broadcast game show channel–

    You wouldn’t likely lose “Match Game” (should the syndicated rights of the
    show even be transferred from GSN to this in-development, FOX-owned
    “Buzzr TV” broadcast game show channel) so long as your geographical
    locale has a FOX affiliate that decides to activate its digital sub-channel option, thus you would be able to obtain this new “Buzzr TV” game show channel for free since it is supposed to be a broadcast/over-the-air (OTA) channel. Whether you have cable and/or satellite service would be irrelevant, as all you would need is an antenna connection to your TV in addition to whatever cable/satellite connection(s) you may also have.

    If your Time Warner service (“UncleVanya”) is allowed to add this “Buzzr
    TV” game show channel, then you wouldn’t even need a TV antenna
    connection to obtain the channel’s signal. But I advise everyone to set
    up a TV antenna connection, whether they have cable/satellite services
    or not, since eventually most will face a situation where their cable/satellite services don’t carry a particular broadcast channel. With antenna connectivity, all that will be necessary is the one-time cost of the antenna and cables to hook up to one’s TV set. Most newer (manufactured post-2010, anyway) TV sets come with built-in tuners, so a digital converter box is unnecessary unless one still has older, tube TV sets without the built-in tuners.

    One may also be able to utilize one’s cable box and/or DVD/VCR player-recorder(s) as sort of switchboxes between antenna and cable/satellite reception, or else consult your cable/satellite TV technician (or a good electronics store tech) about which media setup is best for your particular situation.

    I also advise when one purchases a TV antenna to investigate which one
    will be sufficient to pull in longer-range transmissions obtainable in one’s geographical terrain. Such factors as tall buildings, mountains and/or large trees may be obstructions to more direct TV station transmissions. Besides a simpler “rabbit ears” antenna, more sophisticated amplified and longer-range antennas are available one may install either in the interior of one’s home, on the rooftop, or even in an attic or highest-story crawlspace (generally, the position of one’s antenna and the highest point possible the better for pulling in the furthest available signals). But unless one has expertise in antenna installation (for those attic and rooftop antenna installations) please consult an expert, because it is possible with incorrect installation one could obtain water leaks in one’s roof as well the issue of proper electrical grounding to guard against lightning strikes of one’s home
    (especially for mobile homes/trailers). In apartment and condominium situations, liability could be incurred if one’s antenna installation creates a water leak that damages the unit of another resident. Most interior TV antenna installations should be safe, however.

    The following Internet websites are helpful in researching the distances of
    TV station transmitters from the address of TV antenna(s) installation. The color-coordinated chart and map results help one determine which type of antenna is sufficient for the relevant channel(s) reception–

    TVFool.com, AntennaWeb.org

    I hope this information is basically helpful. Beyond this, please consult an audio-video expert. The Best Buy and Radio Shack retail chains are sometimes good resources for a/v and antenna information (depends upon
    the individual chain-owned or franchise store as to quality level of customer service), as well independent and local electronics stores known to have reliable customer service.